Make Amends With Anything You've Ever Loved

23, Homegrown in Hamilton, Band Manager, Friend, Foe and whatever else you want me to be.

asylum-art:

Brian Smith: Art Obscure

LA based artist, Brian Smith, has an instantly recognizable painting esthetic. His dark futurescapes emanate an aura that is both beautiful and alien. Working both in the figurative realm and the abstract arena, he channels a consistent sense of vast expansiveness, even in his smaller works. The inspiration for his transformative painting’s subjects come from a variety of sources. Some of his hypnotic portraiture communicates a subject frozen in a state of metamorphosis- as if simulating the moment of impact from an intense explosion, or the warping effects of time travel, or the painful reconfiguration of a being in a state of shape shifting. Brian’s paintings transport you to a place that is feels cold and isolated. Although I greatly enjoy visiting this foreboding place, it is not an environment I would want to be trapped inside.

(via asylum-art)

asylum-art:

Cai Guo-Qiang: Amazing sculptures in the best museums

"Inopportune: Stage Two,” 2004 Tigers:

Entering the tiger room, you see the violent act- tigers with arrows pierced into their bodies and there’s a very visceral response. Even though it’s completely fake, the tigers are so realistically made that the audience feels pain when they see the them. The pain is not in the tigers, which obviously can’t feel. The pain is really in the person who’s viewing this. So it’s through the artwork, because it represents pain, that one feels this pain and has this very visceral relationship or reaction to it.”- Cai Guo-Qiang

"HEAD ON”, 2006:

Glass sheet and 99 life-sized replicas of wolves, dimensions variable. Installation view at Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin, 2006. Photo by Hiro Ihara and Mathias Schormann. Courtesy Cai Studio, New York.

"Heritage" 2013:

An installation of 99 life-sized animal sculptures, including pandas, lions, tigers, and kangaroos, all drinking together from a lake surrounded by white sand;inspired by a trip he made ​​in Australia, the artist Cai Guo-Qiang created a huge installation called Heritage, to gather around a swimming pool disguised as a pond 99 replicas of animals from around the world coming to drink. A magnificent work, presented at the Queensland Art Gallery of Modern Art in Brisbane.

Photography: Natasha Harth

Watch this Video:

(via asylum-art)

jesdaniels:

oscob:


You don’t have to look like this.

Banksy strikes the masses with the kind of insight that a 14 year old girl on tumblr has

 

jesdaniels:

oscob:

You don’t have to look like this.

Banksy strikes the masses with the kind of insight that a 14 year old girl on tumblr has

 

(via artagainstsociety)

instagram:

How I Shoot: Underwater Shark Photography with @michaelmuller7

For each How I Shoot, we ask an Instagrammer to tell us about their creative process. To see more of Michael’s photos from his shark expeditions, follow @michaelmuller7 and follow @discoverychannel as Michael takes over Discovery Channel’s Instagram account during Shark Week.

Michael Muller (@michaelmuller7) is on a mission to change the way we see sharks. “They are in a lot of trouble right now,” he says. “100 million are slaughtered every year, and I say slaughter because the majority of the time the shark is killed just for its fins.”

In his day job, Michael is a Hollywood-based commercial photographer renowned for his celebrity portraits and images used in box office billboards. But when he has free time, Michael devotes himself to documenting sharks in their native habitat around the world. He has even created an underwater strobe lighting system as powerful as the one in his California studio. “Realizing that I couldn’t bring the shark into the studio, I knew I would have to bring the studio to it,” he says.

The key to successful underwater shark photography, according to Michael, is staying relaxed. “Anxiety is the biggest obstacle,” he says. “If you let negative thoughts take hold then you are in for a really rough time.”

Michael uses Instagram to share images of his encounters in the deep. Here he tells us more about his process during and after his underwater excursions:

Equipment:

Phase One medium format with Nauticam, Nikon D800 with Subal Housing, Red Epic Dragon, GoPro and a “list of scuba equipment too long to enumerate.”

Vantage Point:

Because Michael rarely shoots from insides shark cages, he works closely with a team to be in the best position possible. “I have to constantly anticipate where the animal may go or do. What we look for always is what we call a ‘player,’which is a shark that is very mellow and curious that will stay around us. It is with sharks like this that magic happens.”

Shooting:

“It’s all about waiting for that right ‘moment’ to hit the trigger, which comes from 28 years experience. If you get too excited and go too fast then you miss that moment. If you wait too long you watch it happen and have the shot in your head, but no one else ever gets to witness it, so timing is everything.“

Editing:

Depending on the length of the shoot, Michael will return with between 3,000-10,000 photos. “I keep every image I take, I get rid of blank images but keep everything else,” he says. “With Instagram I usually post between 4-8 images from a particular trip.” For processing tools, Michael uses his own custom filters app MullerPhoto, and also the newest Instagram creative tools. “There are times I just go right into Instagram and just use its tools which are really getting more and more phenomenal.”

(via dantract)

asylum-art:

IBreathtaking Satellite Photos of Earth from the European Space Agency (ESA)

The European Space Agency (ESA) presented a collection of images of the Earth taken from the satellite. More here.

The ESA has an incredible Observing the Earth archive that’s updated every week and each satelitte image is usually accompanied by a brief essay to explain a bit about what you’re looking at. Collected here are some of my favorite images from the last few years taken with too many different satellites to mention, and you can search photos back through 2005.

vacilandoelmundo:

“So you’re made of detritus [from exploded stars]. Get over it. Or better yet, celebrate it. After all, what nobler thought can one cherish than that the universe lives within us all?”

―Neil deGrasse Tyson

These photos are on the shortlist for the Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2014, a competition and exhibition run by the Royal Observatory Greenwich. The winning images will be posted here on September 18.

(Source: fastcodesign.com, via c0gnitive-dissonance)